IT’S ALL IN THE WAIST

Fashion is always about putting a modern twist on an aged classic. The 70s has been the focus point for designers with the high waisted pant emerging again as a bold trend that has moved seamlessly between runway and sidewalk.

While the models on the runway often sport a skin-tight size of what looks like sprayed on leggings, the high waist trend can be worn across various shapes and sizes.

Anthropologists have theorised about a magical hip-to-waist ratio that is linked to men’s attraction to woman, something the high waisted pant is designed to achieve, but the secret is in balancing what should be loose with what should be tight. Much like any other style of dress, the key is in balancing proportions and knowing what to accentuate on the body.

Paris fashion week saw high waisted pants replicated across countless colour palettes and fabric choices.

Saint-Laurent took its punk rock theme and produced an almost suffocating pair of skin tight leather pants, cut just above the ankle giving what seemed to be an extra foot of leg length.

Luis Vuitton also opted for a leather version, but cut the pant just off the leg for a relatively casual look.

Isabel Marant pushed the boundaries further with the shape, showcasing an extreme high waist in a busy floral print that somehow effortlessly pulled together strong construction elements with soft fabric.

Away from the catwalk, retail chains and boutique designers are also picking up on the trend, pushing out affordable variants with the same formula in mind.

Sass & Bide have a full range of high waisted pants that range across various fabrics from white cotton to sheer black chiffon, along with Ruby and Liam who both featured high waist pant variants in their Summer 2015 collections.

Looking at all the pieces from a distance, a clear theme of empowerment and femininity emerges, a common narrative that has been at the forefront of fashion as designers look at the feminism movement that is centred around building women up to embrace their bodies and take control of their style rather than being dictated by guidelines.