Colours of Aotearoa

For the first time in its three-year history, the Resene Colours of Fashion Project has incorporated black into the selection of colours, including Resene Gumboot and Resene All Black, as to better represent the New Zealand market.

“We decided a New Zealand collection showcasing the colour of fashion wouldn’t be truly complete without black,” said Karen Warman, marketing manager, Resene.

In collaboration with New Zealand Fashion Tech, ten Fashion Design Diploma students were chosen to showcase their silk creations to open the Resene Designer Runway event held at the main stage of the 2016 New Zealand Fashion Week.

--

One of the students to embrace the new black options was Liam Julian-Hunapo, who sought to re-imagine the typical swandri and stubbies, an iconic New Zealand staple and translate it into a modern 2016 alternative. Executed in the colour Resene Gumboot, Hunapo also included a pop of red in the form of silk lining which is matched to Resene Poppy. His journey to fashion began at 15 where he was unsure as to where he wanted to go in life until a teacher directed him towards fashion classes at school. Ultimately he ended up at New Zealand Fashion Tech where he has now been offered the opportunity to travel to Asia along with nine other students after being awarded a Prime Minister’s Scholarship.

--

Having started at New Zealand Fashion Tech’s Wellington campus 18 months ago with no prior knowledge of sewing, Saraiah Tewaa has embraced every opportunity to learn. Her energy and passion have led to her being awarded the opportunity to present her green Resene Limerick creation at the showcase this year, which was recreated during an exchange to India as part of her Prime Minister’s Scholarship for Asia. Her full body jumpsuit with long sleeves incorporated a unique ruffle design sewn into a front seam of the leg, executed in an interesting chrome coloured silk that caught the light and reflected multiple hues of blue and green.

--

For a showcase that is focussed on colour, it is not unusual to see elements of colour blocking and student Sophie Sargent has paired her chosen colour of Resene Buttercup with two others to execute a strong and striking three-piece outfit which overall finds its own balance. Before joining New Zealand Fashion Tech in Wellington, she had previously completed a Bachelor of Arts in theatre studies at Victoria University, with the overall goal of joining her two passions, fashion and theatre, together.

--

Bold and adventurous is how Fiona Chi would describe her outfit, incorporating elements of tailoring and straight lines. True to the name of her chosen colour, Resene Daredevil, the result is a sharp and dramatic two-piece look with the top being the standout item paired with a subtle black pant.

“I chose to pair my colour with a dark contrast in the pants to make it feel edgy and stand out from the crowd. This contrast also displays a bold and adventurous side,” said Chi.

She likened the colour to adrenalin, which is how she described her journey in fashion so far, parallel to her fiery personality which drives her to create designs that are not afraid to demand attention.

--

Silk is not the easiest fabric to work with, and to translate that into a piece of origami is an even bigger feat. But Samantha-Jane Gilliver is not afraid of a challenge, incorporating a black silk origami belt into her red Resene Poppy dress. She focused her attention on texture while keeping a simple silhouette in mind which resulted in the design of a modern halter neck dress that incorporated both contemporary and rebellious design elements.

“Poppies are symbolic of dreams and induced escapes. Laying in a field of gently swaying poppies I wanted to create something bold and feminine,” said Gilliver.

--

Fascinated with gender neutrality, Olli Paroli focussed his design on the story of a breakup by mixing elements of a man’s shirt with a silk camisole. The creation is a new interpretation on the boyfriend shirt that he explained is the last piece of clothing left by the customers former lover. He said the haunting green colour of Resene Permanent Green captures the darkness needed to tell the story without having to resort to using black.

--

An early OE has forever influenced the future designs of Clare Waterings, who at 16 left her school in Taupo to return to her family’s homeland of Holland before attending a French high school and travelling around France. This experience is reflected in her designs which are distinctly inspired by European architecture, including her most recent design which she executed using silk in the colour of Resene Coast.

“Using the idea of contrast, I took the coast and many things you’d see on it and picked something that could be as beautiful as a coastline. I thought of buildings and architecture.”

--

Vivid colours and the introduction of a petal-like ruffle on the skirt are central elements to Johanna Sporry’s design, who was drawn to how flower petals layered on each other to create form. She took silk in the colour Resene Irresistible and transformed it into a cocktail dress described as indelibly bright and impossible to ignore.

--

Inspired by the emotional effect of the colour red, alongside her Maori/Indian heritage, Ganga Patel mixed her love of dressing up in a traditional sari with elements of contemporary design to produce a modern design that plays to her strengths. She was inspired by the eternal knot, fascinated with how its overlaps without a beginning or end and symbolising the Buddha’s endless wisdom and compassion. The knot serves as a merging point for the two reds, one of which is akin to Resene Salsa, with open skirt showing the patterned border of the sari on the inside.

--

No stranger to vibrant colours and attention grabbing fabrics, Jordan Noah uses her love of dance and history of jazz dance competitions to create strong designs including this wide leg jumpsuit relating to the colour Resene Grass Hopper. Green immediately brings to mind imagery of nature, which is an element she wanted to play on throughout the design process.

“The flowy wide leg pant is inspired by the free-flowing feelings as you settle among native trees and the pleated top is inspired by the line texture seen on a grasshopper’s underbelly,” said Noah.